Subjects

Edward Luce

Chief U.S. commentator, Financial Times
Author, Time To Start Thinking

Washington insider speaking to global audiences.

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Biography

Edward Luce is one of the most highly read columnist at the Financial Times, where he has also served as Washington bureau chief, Capital Markets editor, and South Asia bureau chief. From 1999 to 2001, he was speechwriter to Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers. Ed brings a Washington insider’s approach to American issues, ranging from the new normal economics, American foreign policy in an increasingly geopolitical world, to Obama’s presidency, the revival of U.S. cities, and the decline of the U.S. middle class.

His most recent book is Time to Start Thinking: America in the Age of Descent. Ed draws on his considerable experience and connections to mount a controversial argument: America is losing its pragmatism. At other times when doomsayers warned of America's imminent collapse, the country bounced back by focusing on what worked — what was necessary to solve the problems it faced. But over the past few decades, the U.S. has seen the political, social and economic foundations of this pragmatism eroded. In other words, this time could be different — and unless America is prepared to start thinking about solutions in a serious way, it could well lose its unchallenged global leadership status.

Ed is also recognized as one of the leading authorities on a rising India. The Economist declared his book In Spite of the Gods “likely to be the definitive book on India for some time to come.” Other international topics include globalization, China, and the UK. Ed is also an experienced and accomplished moderator.

Books

Time to Start Thinking

America in the Age of Descent

Edward Luce

"Gentlemen, we have run out of money. It is time to start thinking."
— Sir Ernest Rutherford, winner of the Nobel Prize in Nuclear Physics

Time to Start Thinking is a book destined to spark debate among liberals and conservatives alike. Drawing on his decades of exceptional journalism and his connections within Washington and around the world, Luce advances a carefully constructed and controversial argument, backed up by interviews with many of the key players in politics and business, that America is losing its pragmatism — and that the consequences of this may soon leave the country high and dry.

Luce turns his attention to a number of different key issues that are set to affect America's position in the world order: the changing structure of the US economy, the continued polarization of American politics; the debilitating effect of the "permanent election campaign"; the challenges involved in the overhaul of the country's public education system; and the health-or sickliness-of American innovation in technology and business. His conclusion, "An Exceptional Challenge" looks at America's dwindling options in a world where the pace is increasingly being set elsewhere. While many Americans believe that their country can and should retain its status as a global superpower, Luce sees this as an increasingly unlikely scenario, unless Americans themselves can stand up against the country's increasingly plutocratic character. America has bounced back successfully from the shocks of The Great Depression and the Soviet launch of Sputnik, but Luce wonders if the next crisis in American confidence may knock it off the top-dog position for good.

As distressing as it is important, Time to Start Thinking presents an America in economic, social, and political crisis, in danger of losing its most defining and vital characteristic: its pragmatism.

Grove Press (May 7, 2013)
Atlantic Monthly Press (April 3, 2012)

In Spite of the Gods

The Rise of Modern India

Edward Luce

As the world's largest democracy and a rising international economic power, India has long been heralded for its great strides in technology and trade. Yet it is also plagued by poverty, illiteracy, unemployment, and a vast array of other social and economic issues. Here, noted journalist and former Financial Times South Asia bureau chief Edward Luce travels throughout India's many regions, cultures, and religious circles, investigating its fragile balance between tradition and modernity. From meetings with key political figures to fascinating encounters with religious pundits, economic gurus, and village laborers, In Spite of the Gods is a fascinating blend of analysis and reportage that comprehensively depicts the nuances of India's complex situation and its place in the world.

Anchor; Reprint edition (March 11, 2008)
Doubleday; 1 edition (January 16, 2007)

Review

The Power of the Potential of India's Economic ChangeThe New York Times
Midnight's Grandchildren — Sunday Book Review, The New York Times

Videos

Conversation on Aviation with The Boeing Company and United Airlines | The Chicago Forum on Global Cities

Obama's Moment | Charlie Rose

Ed Luce moderated a discussion with Hank Paulson on China | The Chicago Council on Global Affairs

It's 'Time to Start Thinking' America | PBS NewsHour

Feedback

A financial services company:
Dear Ed — Our whole board of trustees thanks you for such a good discussion at our dinner. You could tell that people were very interested in better understanding all that is occurring in the Middle East as well as other global powers, and you were particularly helpful. And now I hope that everyone in that room read your column in today’s FT. You bring a historic perspective — lessons from the past — that provides an excellent context and you have a keen depth of knowledge which assures a fair and full consideration of all the complexities. You help people understand the facts as well as realistic expectations. It was clear that people were engaged and deeply interested from the extent of the questions and we continued to talk about your comments the following day. You lifted our knowledge in important ways. You were also a delight to talk with. I think everyone felt privileged that we had been able to spend this time together and hear your good thoughts and analysis. I send our thanks and our very best on behalf of the entire board of trustees.

Articles

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— Foreign Policy
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